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Ramos Gin Fizz

04/30/2017 , 2m, 59s

In 1888, Henry Ramos invented a New Orleans classic cocktail that was so labor intensive he employed a relay of bartenders to shake it. What a sight that must have been. The subtle citrus flavors and the creamy texture make this one a really treat.

Note that this is served up in a Collins glass, so don't add ice to the serving glass.


  • 2 ounces London dry gin
  • 1/2 ounce fresh lemon juice*
  • 1/2 ounce fresh lime juice*
  • 1/2 ounce simple syrup
  • 1 ounce heavy cream
  • 1 egg white**
  • 3 drops of orange flower water
  • 1 drop of vanilla extract
  • club soda

Everything except the club soda goes into the shaker without ice. Dry shake for about a minute. Add ice and shake again for at least two minutes (feel free to try to shake it for 12 minutes). Carefully pour into a tall glass without ice. Pour enough club soda into the glass to fill it up. Drop in a straw and serve.

*In the podcase, I said 1 ounce. It should be 1/2 ounce.

**If you are squeamish about using raw egg whites, you can substitute pasteurized or powered. But I wouldn't recommend it.


Photos by Lisa Denkinger

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Don't Fear The Egg White (Washington Post)

Ramos Gin Fizz


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Off to Osaka Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 License http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/

Old Fashioned Redux

04/22/2017 , 3m

My first old fashioned whiskey cocktail was Midwest style — being mostly 7-Up and muddled fruit with Canadian Club. It seemed pretty good to me at the time. But my taste in cocktails has changed, and I'm always looking for the best old fashioned I can find.

This episode is just me making an old fashioned cocktail with Rittenhouse rye in a way I've come to really enjoy. It's probably not classic in that I'm recommending brown sugar, but the payoff is so good. I've also made this with a golden rum or, when I'm really feeling like flying in the face of tradition, Plantation Pineapple Rum.

It's all about taking your time and getting the dilution right. Give it a try.


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Queen's Park Hotel Super Cocktail

02/26/2017 , 2m, 59s

I highly recommend Beachbum Berry's book on Carribean drinks. It's not just a recipe book, it's a narrative of the history of tropical drinks in the region. His writeup on the Queen's Park Hotel will definitely not convince you spend a night there, but this cocktail would be one good reason to do so.

Try it with both gold and white rums.


  • 1 1/2 ounce rum, gold or white
  • 1/2 ounce Italian vermouth
  • 1/2 ounce fresh lime juice
  • 1/2 ounce grenadine
  • 4 dashes Angostura bitters

Place all the components in a shaker with ice, shake vigorously. Strain into a coupe, and garnish with a lime wheel.


Photos by Lisa Denkinger

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Jeff Berry's Potions Of The Carribean

Postcard photo of the Queen's Park Hotel, Trinidad


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Off to Osaka Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 License http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/

Bobby Burns

02/06/2017 , 2m, 59s

Named in honor of the national poet of Scotland, the Bobby Burns packs a delicious smokiness you don't often find in a classic cocktail. Try to use a good single malt Scotch whisky in this one. And don't forget to share a cup o' kindness yet for Auld Lang Syne.


  • 2 ounces single malt Scotch whisky
  • 3/4 ounce sweet vermouth
  • 1 barspoon Benedictine

Place all of the ingredients in a mixing glass with ice and stir until well-chilled. Strain into a cocktail glass and garnish with a lemon twist.


Robert Burns

Burns Supper

Dale DeGroff's Recipe


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Bronx

01/29/2017 , 2m, 57s

The third borough cocktail made on Cocktailing, this one is kind of tame. Unlike so many cocktails, the origin of the Bronx is known, and you can read about it in the stories linked below.

Most of the recipes I found for this one use London dry gin. I tried it, but I really found Old Tom to be a better fit for my taste buds. So, try it both ways.


  • 2 ounces gin
  • 1 ounce orange juice
  • 1/2 ounce dry vermouth
  • 1/2 ounce sweet vermouth

Place all of the ingredients in a shaker with ice. Shake vigorously. Strain into a cocktail glass. Garnish with an orange wheel.


Photos by Lisa Denkinger

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Imbibe Magazine Recipe

Serious Eats give some history

David Wondrich's take — note the vermouth ratio


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Brandy Alexander and Mary Tyler Moore

01/28/2017 , 2m, 58s

In memory of the great Mary Tyler Moore, I'm reposting on the Brandy Alexander. In the pilot of The Mary Tyler Moore show, Mary asks for a Brandy Alexander. Not exactly what Mr. Grant had in mind.

Love Is All Around


The Alexander was invented in the early 20th century by Troy Alexander at Rector's in New York City. The original gin gave way to brandy, resulting in the Alexander #2, aka the Brandy Alexander.

The recipe I'm using calls for a 1:1:1 ratio of brandy, creme de cacao, and cream. You'll also find references to a 2:1:1 ratio which definitely seems like a good thing to try.

The nutmeg garnish is important on this one. Try to get a whole nutmeg and grate it on the cocktail. The aroma really enhances the experience.


  • 2 oz. Cognac or brandy
  • 2 oz. creme de cacao (white or dark)
  • 2 oz. heavy cream
  • fresh nutmeg

Place Cognac, creme de cacao, and cream in a shaker with ice. Shake vigorously. Strain into a cocktail glass. Grate fresh nutmeg on top as garnish.


Photos by Lisa Denkinger

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Rector's

The lobster palaces of New York

A little history


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Stinger

01/10/2017 , 2m, 58s

The stinger cocktail was popular among the upper classes after the turn of the 20th Century. Reginald Vanderbilt appears to have been a notorious lover of the stinger. You don't see this one on cocktail menus, and initially the brandy/mint combination seems off-putting. But then think about the mint julep.

The recipes call for white creme de menthe, but you can use green in its place.


  • 2 1/4 ounces brandy
  • 3/4 ounce white creme de menthe

Place the brandy and creme de menthe in a mixing glass with ice and stir until well chilled. Strain into a coupe and serve ungarnished. You can also serve this on the rocks, if you prefer.


Photos by Lisa Denkinger

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Esquire -- David Wonderich's take

Kitchen Riffs — includes some interesting variations


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Brooklyn

01/02/2017 , 3m

The Brooklyn is a delicious cousin of the Manhattan cocktail that uses a truly unusual ingredient that is, alas, hard to find.

The key ingredient, Amer Picon, is not available in the United States and doesn't exist in it's original strenght and formulation even if you find it in France. However, there are efforts to recreate the original Picon, and the Golden Moon version I found seems to do an admirable job. I'm also providing a link to a recipe, if you want to try making own.

The recipe I'm using on this episode is from Ted Haigh's Vintage Spirits And Forgotten Cocktails — a much appreciated Christmas gift.


  • 2 ounces rye or Bourbon
  • 3/4 ounce dry vermouth
  • 2 teaspoons (1/3 ounce) Amer Picon
  • 2 teaspons (1/3 ounce) maraschino liqueur

Place everything into a mixing glass and stir until thoroughly mixed. Strain into a cocktail glass and garnish with a cherry.


Photos by Lisa Denkinger

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Vintage Spirits And Forgotten Cocktails

The story of Amer Picon & a link to make your own

Golden Moon Distillery


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Champs-Élysées

12/18/2016 , 2m, 59s

A classic from 1930's The Savoy Cocktail Book. Superficially similar to a sidecar, this one kicks up the exotic flavors by using Chartreuse. See the note on using green versus yellow varieties of this French liqueur below.

I stumbled across this one while browsing the PDT app on my iPhone, and I find that the recipes out there mostly follow the same ratios with some variations for sweetness. The recipe below seems to turn out a cocktail that is just right for my palette.


  • 2 ounces Cognac
  • 3/4 ounce fresh lemon juice
  • 1/2 ounce Green (or Yellow) Chartreuse
  • 1/4 ounce simple syrup
  • 1 dash Angostura bitters

Place all of the components in a shaker with ice and shake vigorously. Strain into a coupe. Garnish with lemon, if desired.

Note: Every recipe I looked at recommended Green Chartreuse. The PDT app says they use green because the prefer the flavor. Craddock's book doesn't have a recommendation, so it's mostly a matter of taste. If you have both varieties on hand, try it both ways. The yellow version you may find a little sweeter and the green version more herb forward.


Photos by Lisa Denkinger

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Chartreuse


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Aged Eggnog

12/12/2016 , 2m, 59s

I am not a person who finds the words egg and nog together to be particularly appetizing. And growing up, eggnog came from a carton purchased at the grocery store. Honestly, I had no time for the stuff.

But this version, aged, and full of good spirits is making me change my mind. It's very alcohol-forward, so you may want to cut it with some fresh dairy when you serve it.

Lisa joins me on this episode of Cocktailing as she made this eggnog, and we give it a taste two weeks into the aging process. Total aging will be seven weeks.


  • 12 egg yolks
  • 2 cups sugar
  • 1 liter bourbon
  • 4 cups whole milk
  • 1 cup heavy cream
  • 3/4 cup cognac or brandy
  • 1/2 cup dark rum
  • pinch of kosher salt

Combine the yolks and sugar. Add remaining ingredients until well combined. Place in a glass jar and refrigerate for as long as you like. It should be fine to drink after a couple days.


Photos by Lisa Denkinger

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Michael Ruhlman's Blog

Serious Eats Food Lab


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Federation

12/04/2016 , 3m

This is a new classic from Nick Cuarana that I found on the Serious Eats website. I wanted to find a deeply flavored tequila cocktail, and this one fits the bill. Ostensibly it appears to be related to a Sazerac, and there is an absinthe component, but this one stands just fine on its own.

You can try any kind of tequila in this — a mezcal may even be tasty. The añejo imparts a lovely color and depths, I think. I've been drinking the Tempus Fugit creme de cacao lately, and it's terrific stuff — give it a try, if you can find it.


  • Absinthe, to rinse the glass
  • 2 ounces añejo tequila
  • 1/2 ounce creme de cacao
  • 2 dashes Angostura bitters

Rinse the inside of a rocks glass with the absinthe until it is well covered. Discard the excess absinthe (really, just drink it). Add ice. Add the tequila, creme de cacao and bitters. Give it all a gentle stir. Garnish with an orange twist.


Photos by Lisa Denkinger

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Serious Eats

The Straight Up


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Milk Punch

11/27/2016 , 3m

Like it or not, the holidays are upon us. It's a time when our drinks become browner and richer. This milk punch is a nice compromise if you're not an egg nog fan. The milk brings a richness to the warmth of the spirits, and the nutmeg adds the aroma that always puts me in a good mood.

As a big fan of Charles Dickens, Punches intrigue me. So reading through the Punch iOS app and samplng Dave Wondrich's book has put me in a mind to do a future series on punches. Perhaps as a spirit-raiser in the new year.


  • 1 1/4 ounce brandy or bourbon
  • 1/2 ounce dark rum
  • 2 ounces of whole milk or half-and-half
  • 3/4 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 1/2 ounce simple syrup

Add all components to a shaker with ice, and shake vigorously. Strain into a rocks glass and garnish with nutmeg to taste.


Photos by Lisa Denkinger

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Holiday Milk Punch in Garden & Gun

Punch: Delights (and Dangers) of the Flowing Bowl by David Wondrich

Punch iOS app


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Airmail

11/19/2016 , 2m, 39s

The Airmail originally showed up in a 1930s Bacardi recipe pamphlet, and it shows some resemblance to a daiquiri. However, the inclusion of honey as the sweetener give this cocktail a flavor all its own.

We're serving this in a coupe, but it's also good served in a tall collins glass over ice. If you use the tall glass, double the ingredients. You can use prosecco or other sparkling wine in place of the Champagne, if you prefer.

The recipe below is from the PDT cocktail book.


  • 1 ounce rum
  • 1/2 ounce fresh lime juice
  • 1/2 ounce honey syrup
  • 1 ounce Champagne or other sparkling wine

Place rum, lime juice, and honey syrup in a shaker with ice. Shake vigorously. Strain into a chilled coupe and top with sparkling wine. Garnish with a lime.


Photos by Lisa Denkinger

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A Return To Havana

The PDT Project


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Daisy de Martinique

11/07/2016 , 3m

The daisy is a class of cocktails related to fizzes and sours that supports many different base spirits. In this version, we're using rhum agricole, which is made from sugar cane juice rather than from molasses as is the case for a common rum. Since rhum agricole comes from Martinique and other former French colonies, we're calling this cocktail the Daisy de Martinique.

You should be able to find rhum agricole in most well-appointed liquor stores. If you can't find it, you can really use any spirit you like: branch, whiskey, gin, etc. If you use tequila, this comes very close to being a margarita.


  • 2 ounces rhum agricole
  • 1 ounce fresh lemon juice
  • 1/2 ounce grenadine
  • 1/4 ounce simple syrup
  • club soda or other carbonated water

Place rhum, lemon juice, grenadine, and simple syrup in a cocktail shaker with ice and shake vigorously. Strain into a cocktail glass and top with the carbonated water. Garnish with a lemon twist.


Photos by Lisa Denkinger

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A nice writeup on rum vs. rhum

Imbibe! by Dave Wondrich


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Whisky Smash

10/30/2016 , 2m, 45s

The smash is a category of cocktail that refers to a drink with a spirit, an herb, sugar, and a fruit. Today we're making a classic whisky smash with lemon and mint. But there's no reason not to try other combinations that strike your fancy: gin, basil & blackberry anyone?

The mint julep is a specific type of smash. It's a good idea to use whatever fruit is in-season and build the drink around that.


  • Mint leaves, about 8
  • Half a lemon, quartered
  • 1 1/2 Tablespoons simple syrup or granulated sugar
  • 2 ounces Bourbon whisky

Place mint, lemon and simple syrup in an old fashioned glass. Muddle until well mixed and the lemons have expressed their juice. Add Bourbon and stir. Pack with crushed ice or ice cubes. Garnish with mint.


Photos by Lisa Denkinger

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Imbibe: The History of The Smash

Humble Garnish: The Difference Between a Julep and a Smash


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The Last Word

10/23/2016 , 2m, 47s

The Last Word is a pre-Prohibition cocktail first served at the Detroit Athletic Club in the early 1900s. Check out the history of this classic linked below.

The recipes I found seem to call for London dry gin, but I tried it with Hayman's Old Tom and really liked it a lot. Try it both ways to see which you prefer.


  • 3/4 ounce gin (London dry or Old Tom)
  • 3/4 ounce green chartreuse
  • 3/4 ounce maraschino liqueur
  • 3/4 ounce fresh lime juice

Combine all the components in a shaker with ice. Shake vigorously and strain into a coupe. Garnish with a lime wheel, if you want to.


Photos by Lisa Denkinger

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History of The Last Word


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Harvey Wallbanger

10/16/2016 , 2m, 46s

The Harvey Wallbanger is a quintessentially 70s cocktail and will round out our trip to the disco era. The origin of this one is likely a marketing ploy to add a bit of exotic character to a standard screwdriver.

The key ingredient in this one, Galliano, is an Italian liqueur based on anise and vanilla. You'll see the distinctive bottle gathering dust on bar shelves everywhere.


  • 6 ounces orange juice
  • 2 ounces vodka
  • 1 ounce Galliano.

Pour orange juice and vodka into a collins glass over ice. Stir with a long bar spoon. Pour the Galliano carefully over the back of the spoon — it should float atop the drink. Garnish with a orange wedge and a cherry.


Photos by Lisa Denkinger

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In marketing

A brief history of the Harvey Wallbanger


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Grasshopper

10/08/2016 , 2m, 52s

The grasshopper is a classic mint chocolate cocktail. Often you'll find it treated as a dessert, especially when ice cream is used in place of the heavy cream.

The Eater history, linked below, traces the roots of this one back to early 20th or late 19th Century New Orleans. I had no idea. I'd always assumed it was some 70s invention.


  • 1 ounce creme de cacao
  • 1 ounce mint liqueur/creme de menthe
  • 1 ounce heavy cream
  • 1 ounce cognac, optional
  • 2 drops green food coloring, very optional

Place all ingredients in a shaker with ice and shake vigorously. Strain into a cocktail class. Garnish with shaved chocolate or a mint leaf.


Photos by Lisa Denkinger

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The Drink Blog

History Of The Grasshopper from Eater


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Brandy Alexander

10/01/2016 , 2m, 58s

The Alexander was invented in the early 20th century by Troy Alexander at Rector's in New York City. The original gin gave way to brandy, resulting in the Alexander #2, aka the Brandy Alexander.

The recipe I'm using calls for a 1:1:1 ratio of brandy, creme de cacao, and cream. You'll also find references to a 2:1:1 ratio which definitely seems like a good thing to try if you want something less sweet.

The nutmeg garnish is important on this one. Try to get a whole nutmeg and grate it on the cocktail. The aroma really enhances the experience.


  • 2 oz. Cognac or brandy
  • 2 oz. creme de cacao (white or dark)
  • 2 oz. heavy cream
  • fresh nutmeg

Place Cognac, creme de cacao, and cream in a shaker with ice. Shake vigorously. Strain into a cocktail glass. Grate fresh nutmeg on top as garnish.


Photos by Lisa Denkinger

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Rector's

The lobster palaces of New York

A little history


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Off to Osaka Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 License http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/

Piña Colada

09/24/2016 , 2m, 59s

The official drink of Puerto Rico where it was invented by someone sometime in the 1950s. This rich and delicious concoction is often blended, but there's no reason to pull out the hardware. It's perfect when simply shaken. Thanks to Abel, bartender at The Rum House in Manhattan for making that clear.

For best results, please make sure you're listening to The Piña Colada Song while shaking. I do have to wonder how good the piña coladas at O'Malley's Bar are though.

The recipe below is adapted from the PDT mobile app. In the app the recipe uses coconut sorbet rather than Coco López, which sounds delicious.


  • 2 oz. light or amber rum
  • 4 oz. Coco López coconut cream
  • 1 oz. lime juice
  • 1 oz. pineapple juice

Place all ingredients in a shaker with ice and shake vigorously. Serve in a collins glass over ice. Garnish with a cherry, a piece of pineapple, a lime wheel, or all of the above.


Photos by Lisa Denkinger

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History of the piña colada

Escape (The Piña Colada Song) by Rupert Holmes


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Martinez

09/10/2016 , 2m, 59s

The Martinez is something like a Manhattan with gin substituted for the whiskey, and this is sweet cocktail will probably reminder you of that classic. First appearing in the mid-to-late 1800s, this classic seems to have as many formulations as there are bartenders.

The recipe below is from the PDT mobile app. Please play with the proportions of gin and vermouth to find the flavor that's right for you.


  • 1 1/2 ounce Old Tom gin (such as Hayman's)
  • 1 1/2 ounce sweet red vermouth (such as Dolin Rouge)
  • 1/4 ounce maraschino liqueur
  • 1 dash of bitters (such as Angostura)

Place all of the components in a mixing class with ice and stir vigorously. Serve up in a cocktail class. Garnish with cherries or a lemon twist.


Photos by Lisa Denkinger

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Saveur article

PDT iOS app


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Diamondback

09/03/2016 , 2m, 59s

The Diamondback referred to is the Maryland terrapin, which makes sense given this herbaceous cocktail originated in Baltimore's Diamondback Lounge.

The original recipe and others I've read don't include the bitters, but I'm going to suggest you give that a try. If it's not to your liking, leave it out.

Thanks to Cold Glass for the take on this cocktail.


  • 1 1/2 ounce rye whiskey (Rittenhouse is good here)
  • 3/4 ounce apple branch
  • 1/2 ounce yellow Chartreuse
  • Dash of Peychaud's bitters (optional)

Place all the components in a mixing glass with ice and stir until chilled. Server up in a coupe.


Photos by Lisa Denkinger

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Cold Glass


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20th Century

08/27/2016 , 3m

Charles A. Tuck came up with this winner in 1937 to honor of the 20th Century Limited train running between New York City and Chicago.

The chocolate should just be an undertone in this one, not the star. Adjust the amount of crème de cacao to your taste.


  • 1 1/2 ounce gin
  • 3/4 ounce Lillet Blanc
  • 1/2 ounce white crème de cacao
  • 3/4 ounce lemon juice

Place all of the components in a cocktail shaker and shake vigorously. Pour into a cocktail class and garnish with a lemon twist (optional).


Photos by Lisa Denkinger

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Kitchen Riffs

20th Century Limited

C. A. Tuck's book


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Off to Osaka Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 License http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/

La Paloma

08/20/2016 , 2m, 47s

This is a great refresher when the temperature is high and the humidity is higher.

If you don't have fresh grapefruits or grapefruit juice, you can use a grapefruit soda like Jarritos or Squirt. In that case, leave out the agave nectar as they are already sweetened.


  • 2 ounces tequila
  • 3 ounces grapefruit juice
  • 1/2 ounce Aperol
  • 1/2 ounce agave nectar or simple syrup
  • 4 ounces club soda
  • 1/4 ounce lime juice

Combine tequila, grapefruit juice, agave nectar, and Aperol in shaker with ice. Shake vigorously. Pour into collins glass over ice. Top with club soda and lime juice. Garnish with a lime wedge or grapefruit slice.


Photos by Lisa Denkinger

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David Wondrich on La Paloma

In Praise of La Paloma


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Off to Osaka Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 License http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/

Boulevardier

08/13/2016 , 3m

The boulevardier is a variation on a gin-based negroni. The whiskey offers a deeper flavor than the gin.


  • 1 ounce whiskey (Bourbon or rye)*
  • 1 ounce sweet vermouth
  • 1 ounce Campari

Combine all ingredients in a mixing glass. Add ice and stir. Pour into a coupe and garnish with cherry.

*If you like a less bitter drink, increase the whiskey to 1 1/2 ounces and cut each of the other ingredients to 3/4 ounce.


Photos by Lisa Denkinger

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Bitter Rivals: Boulevardier vs. Negroni

Serious Eats

Barflies & Cocktails Book


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Singapore Sling

08/06/2016 , 2m, 59s

Originating in Singapore (go figure) at the Raffles Hotel around 1915, this sling is a great refuge on a hot day in the tropics. The recipe I'm using is from the Death & Company book, and it seems to be based on the original or as close to the original version as we can get. Read the history pieces linked below for more on that.


  • 1 1/2 ounce London dry gin
  • 1/2 ounce Cherry Heering
  • 1/4 ounce Cointreau
  • 1/4 ounce Benedictine
  • 2 ounces pineapple juice
  • 1/2 ounce lime juice
  • 1/2 ounce grenadine
  • 1 dash of Angostura bitters

Put all the ingredients in a shaker. Add just a couple of ice cubes and give it a shake for only 5-10 seconds. Pour into a glass over ice. Garnish with a cherry and, if you have it, pineapple.


Photos by Lisa Denkinger

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David Wondrich, History of the Singapore Sling

Drinkboy on the Singapore Sling

Death & Company Book


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Beachcomber

07/30/2016 , 2m, 22s

Last week we used all the booze to make a zombie, but this week, in the penultimate tiki drink of this series, we go much simpler. This one comes from Trader Vic's 1947 Bartender's Guide.


  • 1 1/2 ounce light rum
  • 3/4 ounce Cointreau or other orange liqueur
  • 3/4 ounce lime juice
  • 1/4 ounce maraschino liqueur
  • 1/8 ounce simple syrup

Put all the components in a shaker and give a vigorous shake. Serve up, strained into a coupe. Garnish with a lime and/or cherry.


Photos by Lisa Denkinger

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Recipe from The Kitchn


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Off to Osaka Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 License http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/

It's A Zombie!

07/23/2016 , 2m, 59s

After a brief hiatus from the tiki series, I'm back with the promised zombie. There is so much rum in this, I can't imagine having more than two. One is probably enough. You have been warned. This is an amalgam of a couple different recipes I liked.

Since there's so much ice in this, the float will give you a pop of flavor when you get to the bottom of the drink, where it's most watered down.

Also, feel free to swap the fruit juices for others you may like.


  • 1 1/2 ounce white rum
  • 1 1/2 ounce gold rum
  • 1 ounce demerara (or black strap) rum
  • 3/4 ounce grapefruit juice
  • 3/4 ounce fresh lime juice
  • 3/4 ounce pineapple juice
  • 1/2 ounce falernum
  • 1 dash Angostura bitters
  • 1/2 teaspoon absinth, Pernod, Herbsaint
  • 1 teaspoon grenadine
  • 1/2 ounce 151-proof rum for float

Put all the components except the 151 rum in a mixing glass. Add ice and stir until chilled through an well mixed. Pour into a tiki mug or collins glass packed three-quarters with crushed ice. Add more crushed ice. Top with the 151 rum float by pouring it carefully over the top of the cocktail.

Add a straw, and garnish with a fancy tiki stirrer, a cherry, some mint, and an umbrella. You can even light the 151 on fire, if you're feeling frisky.


Photos by Lisa Denkinger

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Falernum

Falernum Ingredients

Fun take by Dave Wondrich


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Off to Osaka Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 License http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/

Not A Zombie!

07/16/2016 , 3m

Due to the fact that I haven't gotten all the components together yet, the Zombie episode will be delayed until next week. In the meantime, I yap about rye and bourbon whiskey.


Photos by Me

A bunch of whisk(e)y

Making falernum

Made falernum


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Scorpion

07/09/2016 , 3m

Trader Vic tweaked this one a lot as did Don The Beachcomber. Neither of them originated the drink, but they took a lot of time perfecting it. The version presented here is based on a recipe by Beachbum Berry. This is the single serving version of the popular communal, bowl cocktail.


  • 2 oz light rum
  • 1/2 oz. brandy or cognac
  • 2 oz. fresh orange juice
  • 1 oz. fresh lemon juice
  • 1/2 oz. orgeat syrup
  • 1/2 oz. dark rum as a float

Combine all the components except the dark rum in a shaker. Add ice and shake vigorously. Pour over ice into a collins glass or tiki mug. Carefully pour the dark rum into the glass -- it should float to the top. Garnish with an orange wedge and a single straw.


Photos by Lisa Denkinger

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Beachbum Berry

Kitchen Riffs Scorpion

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Off to Osaka Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 License http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/

Pimm's No. 1 Cup

07/02/2016 , 2m, 59s

Journey back to 19th Century Britain with this refreshing summer cooler.

Note that if you decide to use sparkling water, add 3/4 oz. of simple syrup to the mixture before shaking.


  • 1 slice cucumber
  • 1 1/2 oz. Pimm's No. 1
  • 1/2 oz. gin
  • 1 oz. lemon juice
  • Lemonade, ginger ale, sparkling water

Place cucumber in a shaker and muddle thoroughly. Add Pimm's, lemon juice, and gin (and simple syrup, if using). Add ice and shake vigorously. Pour into a tall glass over ice, garnish with slices of cucumber and lemon. Top with lemonade, ginger ale, sparkling water. Garnish with a lemon wheel.


Photos by Lisa Denkinger

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Off to Osaka Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 License http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/

Kentucky Mule

06/25/2016 , 2m, 59s

Contrived as a way to get Americans to drink vodka and as a way to move some unpopular ginger beer, the Moscow mule is a simple drink. It's even better when you substitute the vodka with bourbon whisky. Or tequila.


  • 2 1/2 oz. Kentucky bourbon whisky
  • 1 oz. fresh lime juice
  • 5 oz. ginger beer

Combine all components in a mule mug (or suitable glass), add ice, and stir. Garnish with a lime wheel and mint, if you like.


Photos by Lisa Denkinger

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Dave Wondrich on the Moscow Mule

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Shaking and Stirring + a spritz

06/18/2016 , 3m

Due to my being a dope, the Kentucky Mule is delayed. But I do talk about why one would shake a cocktail rather than stirring it. But I do give you an easy Aperol spritz recipe.


Off to Osaka Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 License http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/

Aviation

06/11/2016 , 2m, 52s

A classic from 1917 that pays homage to the wild blue yonder.


  • 2 oz. Plymouth gin
  • 1/2 oz. Maraschino liqueur
  • 1/4 oz. Creme de Violette
  • 3/4 oz. fresh lemon juice

Place all components in a cocktail shaker with ice and shake vigorously. Pour into a coupe or Nick & Nora and garnish with a cherry.


Photos by Lisa Denkinger

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A nice little history


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Scofflaw

06/04/2016 , 2m, 13s

This whiskey cocktail originated in Paris as a reaction to U.S. Prohibition. The whiskey, vermouth, grenadine combination gives you a stiff and fruity drink.

See the Death & Co book for this and other great cocktails


  • 1 1/2 oz. rye whiskey
  • 1 oz. Dolin blanc vermouth
  • 1/2 oz. fresh lemon juice
  • 1/2 oz. high-quality grenadine

Place all of the components in a shaker with ice and shake vigorously. Pour into a coupe or other appropriate cocktail class.


Photos by Lisa Denkinger

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Death & Co. book


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17: Corpse Reviver #2

05/27/2016 , 2m, 41s

The stiff cocktail comes from 1930 as one in a family of hair of the dog cocktails. It's good for whatever might be ailing you. Enjoy it in moderation.

Note on the Lillet Blanc vs. Cocchi Americano, the former is sweeter and the latter is more bitter. So choose the one that appeals to your taste. Both are generally available.


  • 1 oz. gin
  • 1 oz. Cocchi American or Lillet Blanc, as preferred
  • 1 oz. Cointreau
  • 1 oz. fresh lemon juice
  • 1 dash absinthe

Place all components in a shaker with ice and shake vigorously. Pour into a cocktail glass. Garnish with an orange peel or cherry.


Photos by Lisa Denkinger

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The Tail Of The Cocktail Take


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16: Mai Tai

05/22/2016 , 3m

Probably invented in the 1940s by Trader Vic (Victor Bergeron) or maybe in the 1930s by Don The Beachcomber, this bracing tiki drink is perfect for a hot day at the beach. Don't be fooled by the sweet, fruity junk you find at some bars -- made right, this is a delicious and poweful cocktail.


  • 1 oz. amber rum
  • 1 oz. dark rum
  • 1 oz. fresh lime juice
  • 1/2 oz. quality orgeat
  • 1/2 oz. orange curaçao or Cointreau

Place all ingredients in a shaker and shake vigorously. Pour into a tall glass over crushed ice or ice cubes. Garnish with the shell of one of the limes you squeezed and a mint sprig, if you like.


Photos By Lisa Denkinger

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Dave Wondrich's Mai Tai Take


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15: Sazerac

05/14/2016 , 2m, 59s

This classic is the subject of much myth and tradition. It came from New Orleans in the mid-1800s and, while originally made with cognac it now is most commonly based on rye whisky.

The recipe I'm making is an amalgam of those I reviewed. Rather than the traditional sugar cube, I'm using simple syrup. Also, I'm leaving the lemon peel with the cocktail though the tradition is to throw it out -- I like the smell. And finally, I'm including Angostura in addition to the more medicinal Peychaud's.


  • 1 tsp. simple syrup
  • 2 dashes Peychaud's bitters
  • 1 dash Angostura bitters
  • 2 1/2 oz. rye whisky or cognac

  • Absinthe or Herbsaint

  • Lemon peel

In a mixing glass, add the simple syrup, bitters and rye. Add ice and give it a good stir. In a well-chilled glass, add absinthe and coat the inside of the glass thoroughly. Discard excess absinthe. Pour the mixture into the coated glass. Squeeze the lemon peel over the surface of the drink to release the oils. Drop the peel into the glass.


Photos By Lisa Denkinger

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Dave Wondrich's Sazerac Take

Sazerac Dos and Don'ts


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14: Mint Julep

05/07/2016 , 2m, 42s

It's Derby Day, and in honor we're going to make a Mint Julep -- the official drink of The Kentucky Derby. However, I do use Oregon bourbon. The horror. So, get our your hammer and start crushing some ice.

Don't skip the garnish as it really adds to the mint character of the drink.


  • 8 leaves of fresh mint
  • 1 tsp. sugar
  • 3 oz. bourbon (Kentucky, if you're a purist)

In a well chilled silver beaker or glass, drop the mint leaves and the sugar. Muddle briefly. Pack the beaker half-full with ice. Add the bourbon and stir. Top up with ice, mounding slightly. Garnish with a sprig of mint.


Photos by Lisa Denkinger

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Checkout Bourbon Curious by our friend, Fred Minnick. Fred is the Bourbon Authority at the Kentucky Derby Museum. He would not be amused by the bourbon I used in this episode.


Off to Osaka Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 License http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/

13: El Diablo

05/01/2016 , 2m, 45s

We come to the end of our three-part tequila series with this refresher. The crème de cassis lends it a beautiful purple color, and the ginger beer gives it a zing. Next week, in the lead-up to The Kentucky Derby, we'll make a mint julep.


  • 1 1/2 oz. reposado tequila
  • 1/2 oz. crème de cassis
  • 1/2 oz. lime juice
  • 3 oz. ginger beer

In a shaker, add tequila, crème de cassis, lime juice, and ice. Shake until thoroughly combined. Pour into a collins glass over ice. Top off the cocktail with ginger beer. Garnish with a lime wheel.

Photos by Lisa Denkinger

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Off to Osaka Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 License http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/

12: Tequila Sunrise

04/22/2016 , 3m

In part 2 of the tequila series, we take a trip to the 70s. It's a little a little cheesy and not really classic, but still tasty. It might be just the thing when you're tired of the mimosa at brunch. Next week we come to the end of tequila (for now) with an El Diablo.


  • 3 oz. reposado tequila
  • 6 oz. orange juice
  • 2 tsp. grenadine

In a glass with ice, add the tequila, then the orange juice. To get the sunrise effect, pour the grenadine down the inside of the glass. It will pool at the bottom and mix with the other components. Garnish with an orange.

Photos by Lisa Denkinger

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Just Another Tequila Sunrise by Jeff Burkhart

Tequila Sunrise - Cypress Hill


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11: Margarita

04/16/2016 , 2m, 59s

The margarita may be a common cocktail, but it often seems hard to find a really good one. We finally found a ratio of tequila/Cointreau/lime juice that fits our taste, and I'm making that for you in this episode.

This is part 1 of a three part series on tequila. Next week: Tequila Sunrise.

2 oz. Silver Tequila
2 oz. Cointreau or triple sec
2 oz. Lime juice
Agave nectar or simple syrup to taste

In a shaker, combine all components. Add ice and shake well. Serve up or on
the rocks. Rim the glass with salt, if you like, and garnish with a lime.

Photos, as always, by Lisa Denkinger

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Off to Osaka Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com)
Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 License
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10: Remember The Maine!

04/09/2016 , 2m, 59s

First described by Charles H. Baker in 1933, this cocktail derives its name from the rallying cry ginned up by jingoistic newspaper owners trying to get the U.S. to declare war on Spain in 1899. Don't let the violent origins turn you off, this one is worth trying.

2 oz. whiskey
3/4 oz. sweet vermouth
2 tsp. Cherry Heering
1/2 tsp. absinthe

Combine all components in a mixing glass, add ice, and stir. Strain into a
cocktail glass and garnish with a cherry.

Photos by Lisa Denkinger

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USS Maine

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9: Negroni

04/01/2016 , 2m, 57s

Coming out of Italy in the early 20th Century, David Wondrich has called this one of the world's indispensable cocktails.

Next week: Remember The Maine!!!!

1 oz. gin
1 oz. Campari
1 oz. sweet vermouth

Add everything to a shaker, add ice and shake.
Strain into a cocktail class.
Garnish with an orange twist.

Photos by Lisa Denkinger:

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David Wondrich: The Ultimate Negroni Recipe

Off to Osaka Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com)
Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 License
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8: French 75

03/25/2016 , 3m, 1s

Name for a famous French artillery piece, this gentle cocktail is perfect for a beautiful Spring day. Feel free to substitute cognac for the gin.

From the Death & Co. book

1 1/2 oz. gin (or cognac)
3/4 oz. fresh lemon juice
1/2 oz. simple syrup
Champagne

Shake everything except the Champagne with ice.
Pour into a flute. Top with Champagne.
Garnish with a lemon twist.

See photo

Death & Co. book

7: Old Fashioned

03/18/2016 , 2m, 40s

It's not just a soda-soaked fruit soup for your grandpa. This is a simple, easy, pure cocktail that I hope you like.

2 oz. rye or Bourbon
1/2 oz. simple syrup
2 dashes bitters (Angostura or something more exotic)

Add all ingredients to a mixing glass, add ice, and stir. Strain into a
rocks glass over ice. Garnish with orange peel and/or lemon peel. Add a
cherry, if you're feeling frisky.

Note: In the audio, it sounds like I'm using three dashes of bitters. It's
really only two dashes.

See photo

See photo

Photos by Lisa Denkinger

Robert Simonson's book all about The Old Fashioned

Next week: French 75

6: Sidecar

03/12/2016 , 2m, 48s

Give this sweet and sour classic a try. It dates from the early 1920s and may have originated in either London or Paris -- or maybe somewhere else.

2 oz. cognac
1 oz. Cointreau
3/4 oz. lemon juice

Add the components to a shaker, add ice, and shake until the shaker is
frosty. Pour into a sugar rimmed cocktail glass. Garnish with a lemon
twist.

See photo

See photo

Photo by Lisa Denkinger

5: Tailspin

03/04/2016 , 2m, 36s

This is a classic variation on the Bijou cocktail. I was introduced to this cocktail by a regular denizen at Death & Co. in Manhattan. The following comes from their book, linked below.

1 1/2 oz. Gin
1 oz. Sweet Vermouth
1 oz. Green Chartreuse
Orange bitters
Campari

Stir together gin, vermouth, chartreuse, and bitters in a mixing glass.

Use the Campari to rinse the inside of the serving glass, discard extra.

Garnish with a twist of lemon.

See Photo

Photo by Lisa Denkinger

Death & Co. Book

4: New York Sour

02/26/2016 , 2m, 53s

This dramatic classic is as tasty as it is pretty.

2 oz. whiskey
1 oz. fresh lemon juice
1 oz. simple syrup
1 oz. red wine

Shake first three components. Add the red wine as a float.

Garnish with a cherry.

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Photos by Lisa Denkinger

David Wondrich's Twitter feed

Imbibe!

Join me next week for a gin-based cocktail, the Tailspin.

3: Extra -- Cherries!

02/18/2016 , 1m, 25s

Put them in your mouth!

Amarena Fabbri

Luxaro Maraschino

Amarena Toschi

Photos by Lisa Denkinger

3: Perfect Manhattan

02/18/2016 , 2m, 7s

I was first introduced to this drink by a bartender at Trump Hotel in Las Vegas. The equal mix of sweet and dry vermouth is what makes this one perfect.

2 oz. rye or bourbon
1/2 oz. sweet vermouth
1/2 oz. dry vermouth
2 dashes bitters

Stir and serve up.

Garnish with a cherry

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See Photo

Photos by Lisa Denkinger

Join me next week for a New York Sour, a dramatic drink that is showing up on cocktail menus lately.

2: Extra -- Daiquiri with a twist

02/12/2016 , 1m, 45s

This is the Huascar Daiquiri. If you find yourself in Crown Heights, Brooklyn, visit Tooker Alley for this great take on a classic cocktail

See Photo Photo by Lisa Denkinger

2: Daiquiri

02/12/2016 , 2m, 45s

Such a simple and delicious cocktail. Join me and make that awesome drink. Do it!

2 oz. white rum
1 oz. fresh lime juice
3/4 oz. simple syrup

See Photo photo by Lisa Denkinger

Join me next week where we make a Manhattan.

1a: Mic Check

02/06/2016 , 37s

New equipment!

Hello, Cleveland!

1: Vieux Carré

02/04/2016 , 2m, 58s

This great New Orleans cocktail takes its name from the French Quarter.There are a lot of different ingredients in this one, but the effort of gathering them is well worth it.

Here's the recipe I make in the episode:

  3/4 oz. Rye Whiskey 
  3/4 oz. Cognac 
  3/4 oz. Sweet Vermouth 
  1 barspoon/tsp Benedictine 
  1 dash Peychaud's bitters 
  1 dash Angostura bitters 
  Garnish: lemon twist 

See Photo

Please direct any questions or comments to @TroyCocktailing on Twitter.

0: Welcome To Cocktailing

01/31/2016 , 44s

Cocktailing is a new micro-podcast by me, Troy Denkinger. I plan to make a different cocktail every week, and talk a bit about the history and background of the drink.I'm not an expert, I'm just an interested bystander who loves a good cocktail. Next time, I'll make a Vieux Carré and talk a little a bit about this excellent cocktail's origin.